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Petra's remarkable thermal bore cuts through undrillable rock

San Francisco startup Petra says its new contactless thermal drilling robot can make steady progress through the hardest rock on Earth - stuff that would normally destroy drilling equipment - so quickly and cheaply that it could make a lot of underground infrastructure projects economically...

Jan 12, 2022 by New Atlas
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Virginia hospital found in contempt of court for denying patient prescribed round of Ivermectin Science & Medicine News · Dec 22, 2021 by Just The News

A Virginia court on Monday found a hospital in the state in contempt of court for failing to comply with previous orders to provide prescribed Ivermectin to a COVID-19 patient. The court ruled that if the Fauquier Health hospital, in Warrenton, failed to provide the dose by 9 p.m.


NASA Craft 'Touches' Sun for 1st Time, Dives Into Atmosphere Science & Medicine News · Dec 22, 2021 by USNews.com

By MARCIA DUNN, AP Aerospace Writer CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) - A NASA spacecraft has officially "touched" the sun, plunging through the unexplored solar atmosphere known as the corona. Scientists announced the news Tuesday during a meeting of the American Geophysical Union.


Potentially Hazardous Asteroid Nereus Which Flew Past Earth Could Be Mined for Precious Metals Worth Billions Science & Medicine News · Dec 13, 2021 by New York Weekly Times

Space mining is an idea that began taking hold at the turn of the century, and 10 years ago, it was passionately discussed. Many argued that space mining could revolutionise the commercial space economy by employing robots and private astronauts to explore and mine near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) for precious metals and even rare earth metals.


Physicists Discover a Remarkable New Type of Sound Wave Science & Medicine News · Dec 13, 2021 by SciTechDaily

Can you imagine sound travels in the same way as light does? A research team at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) discovered a new type of sound wave: the airborne sound wave vibrates transversely and carries both spin and orbital angular momentum like light does. The findings shattered scientist


Scientists Mapped Every Large Solar Plant on the Planet Using Satellites and Machine Learning

An astonishing 82 percent decrease in the cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy since 2010 has given the world a fighting chance to build a zero-emissions energy system which might be less costly than the fossil-fueled system it replaces.

Dec 11, 2021 by Lucas Kruitwagen - Singularity Hub
Science & Medicine News
Bottom-up fabrication of a proteasome-nanopore that unravels and processes single proteins Science & Medicine Blogs · Dec 11, 2021 by Nature Chemistry

An integrated multiprotein nanopore has been fabricated using components from all three domains of life. This molecular machine opens the door to two approaches in single-molecule protein analysis, in which selected substrate proteins are unfolded, fed to into the proteasomal chamber and then processed either as fragmented peptides or intact polypeptides.


Astronomers Discover Massive Planet 10 Times Bigger Than Jupiter Science & Medicine Blogs · Dec 11, 2021 by www.theepochtimes.com

A group of astronomers has discovered one of the biggest planets ever found orbiting a massive and extremely hot two-star system, despite previously believing that such an environment was too inhospitable for a planet to form in. The planet was discovered by Markus Janson, a professor of astronomy at Stockholm University, and colleagues, according to research published Wednesday in the science journal Nature.


Physicists Transform Pure Energy into Matter and Antimatter Science & Medicine News · Dec 11, 2021 by Labroots

A new study published in Physical Review Letters presents evidence for the creation of matter and antimatter from energy, specifically light particles (photons). In doing so, it offers a splendidly concrete example of the world's most famous equation: E=mc2. The equation, derived by Einstein, dictates how energy (E) is equivalent to mass (m) times the speed of light (c) squared.


Scientists 3D-Print Programmable Living Structures With New Microbial Ink Science & Medicine News · Nov 30, 2021 by Edd Gent

Our mastery of biology has improved dramatically in recent decades , but we are still largely restricted to n ature's repertoire of forms. That could be about to change with the creation of a living ink made out of microbes that can be printed into a variety of 3D shapes.




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Battling the Human Trafficking Fight - Part 1 Science & Medicine Articles · May 12, 2020 by Special Guest Author - Tim Easton, Anti-Terrorism Expert

(“Evil People Will Push The Limits of Evil Deeds to Feed their Sick Addiction and Greed”)

Special thanks to GUEST AUTHOR Tim Easton, Owner of Castle Defense 360 IED Response & Active Shooter Instructor, Tactics Trainer, Physical Security & Anti-Terrorism Expert


Battling the Human Trafficking Fight - Part 2 The Social Media Danger Science & Medicine Articles · May 12, 2020 by Special Guest Author - Tim Easton, Anti-Terrorism Expert

(“Evil People Will Push The Limits of Evil Deeds to Feed their Sick Addiction and Greed”)

Special thanks to GUEST AUTHOR Tim Easton, Owner of Castle Defense 360 IED Response & Active Shooter Instructor, Tactics Trainer, Physical Security & Anti-Terrorism Expert


Broad Institute Research Roundup - June 2019 Science & Medicine Articles · Jun 21, 2019 by Broad Institute

Seeing cells through a DNA lens, bringing new autism genes to the forefront, mining tuberculosis mutants for new treatment options, and more.



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Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form

Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study. This chromatin remodeling, which allows specific genes involved in storing memories to become more active, takes place in multiple stages spread out over several days.

Nov 22, 2021 by MIT News | Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Science & Medicine News
Microrobot fish swims through the body to vomit drugs on cancer Tech News · Nov 17, 2021 by New Atlas

Delivering chemotherapy drugs directly to cancers could help reduce side effects, and soon that job could be done by tiny 3D-printed robotic animals. These microrobots are steered by magnets, and only release their drug payload when they encounter the acidic environment around a tumor.


Nanomaterial 'aerographene' used to create extremely powerful pumps Tech News · Nov 15, 2021 by Phys

An international research team led by Kiel has developed a new method for the generation of controllable electrical explosions. Theoretically, it only takes 450 grams of this material to lift an elephant: "Aerographene" owes this ability to its unique structure at the nano level.


Ex-SpaceX engineers bring Mars colony tech to Earth Science & Medicine News · Nov 14, 2021 by Freethink

Nuclear power is going mini. Former SpaceX engineers are creating a portable microreactor that is lightweight and cost-effective, calling it the "world's first portable, zero-emissions power source." It was originally a project imagined for Mars, but the team decided Earth needed it more (or, at least, sooner).


Paralysed mice walk again after gel is injected into spinal cord Science & Medicine News · Nov 11, 2021 by Carissa Wong - NewScientist

A self-assembling gel that stimulates nerve regeneration has shown promise as a treatment for paralysis in mice A self-assembling gel injected at the site of spinal cord injuries in paralysed mice has enabled them to walk again after four weeks. The gel mimics the matrix that is normally found around cells, providing a scaffold that helps cells to grow.


Researchers at the brink of fusion ignition at National Ignition Facility

After decades of inertial confinement fusion research, a record yield of more than 1.3 megajoules (MJ) from fusion reactions was achieved in the laboratory for the first time during an experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF) on Aug. 8, 2021.

Nov 08, 2021 by Phys
Tech News
A comparison of official Government reports suggest the Fully Vaccinated are developing Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) much faster than anticipated Conspiracy News · Oct 15, 2021 by Before It's News | People Powered News

Latest UK PHE Vaccine Surveillance Report figures on Covid -19 cases show that doubly vaccinated 40-79 year olds have lost 44% of their immune system capability. Their immune systems are deteriorating at around 5% per week (between 3.8% and 9.1%). If this continues then 30-59 year olds will have zero...


Anti-cancer drug derived from fungus shows promise in clinical trials Science & Medicine News · Oct 08, 2021 by U Oxford Press

A new industry-academic partnership between the University of Oxford and biopharmaceutical company NuCana as found that chemotherapy drug NUC-7738, derived from a Himalayan fungus, has 40 times greater potency for killing cancer cells than its parent compound.


Canadian Doctor Says 'Something Malicious is Going On' After He's Punished For Treating COVID Patients with Ivermectin World News · Oct 04, 2021 by Debra Heine - American Greatness

A Canadian emergency room physician has been banned from practicing medicine in Alberta after he defied the province's COVID treatment protocols by prescribing Ivermectin to three patients. In a powerful speech last week, Dr. Daniel Nagase vented about the shoddy way COVID patients were being treated in a rural hospital in Alberta, and concluded that "something malicious is going on."


AlphaFold Is The Most Important Achievement In AI-Ever Tech News · Oct 03, 2021 by Rob Toews

It can be difficult to distinguish between substance and hype in the field of artificial intelligence. In order to stay grounded, it is important to step back from time to time and ask a simple question: what has AI actually accomplished or enabled that makes a difference in the real world?



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The Mystery behind the 18 Giant Skeletons found in the USA

18 Strange Skeletons Found in Wisconsin Nine-foot Skeletons with Huge Heads and Strange Facial Features Shocked Scientists When They Were Uncovered 107 Year Ago Scientists are remaining stubbornly silent about a lost race of giants found in burial mounds near Lake Delavan, Wisconsin, in May 1912.

Nov 22, 2021 by Archaeology World Team
Science & Medicine Blogs
Scientists discover animal that doesn't need oxygen to live Science & Medicine Blogs · Nov 14, 2021 by Big Think

In the time it takes you to read this article, you're likely to breathe a few dozen times. Some animals don't breathe as often, and they don't require nearly as much oxygen. The Loggerhead sea turtle, for example, can take one breath and stay underwater for about 10 hours.


What is the Nuclear EMC effect? Scientists shed light on a physics-defying mystery Science & Medicine Blogs · Nov 13, 2021 by Inverse

Nuclear science is many things: it's powerful, it's potentially dangerous, and it's ultimately still not totally understood by scientists - at least when it comes to its constituent parts. Controlling the splitting of atoms to fuel a nuclear reaction is old hat these days, but while scientists understand how these reactions take place what they don't understand completely is something much more fundamental: the behavior of protons and neutrons.


Mysterious radio waves are radiating from an unknown object at the heart of the Milky Way, astronomers say Science & Medicine Blogs · Nov 13, 2021 by Business Insider

Astronomers detected mysterious radio waves from the center of the galaxy that vary dramatically and seem to shut off at random. The waves' origin is unknown, so they hint at the existence of a new type of celestial object. The signal doesn't look like the kind that comes from stars, planets, or even dead stars.


Scientists use olive oil to discover new universal physics law Science & Medicine Blogs · Nov 13, 2021 by Big Think

The dressing in your salad might redefine science if you look carefully enough. Researchers in the Netherlands used a drop of olive oil to discover a new universal law of phase transitions. The research was carried out by the Interacting Photons group of the AMOLF institute, which focuses on fundamental physics.


Discovery of metal-breathing bacteria can change electronics

Researchers discovered an unusual property of a bacteria that can "breathe" in some metal and sulfur compounds and create materials that can improve electronics, energy storage, and medical devices. Specifically, the anaerobic Shewanella oneidensis bacterium can produce molybdenum disulfide, a material that can transfer electronics as well as graphene, explains the press release from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, whose team of engineers carried out the research.

Nov 13, 2021 by Big Think
Science & Medicine Blogs
CT scans of shark intestines find Nikola Tesla's one-way valve Science & Medicine Blogs · Oct 16, 2021 by Big Think

Considering how much sharks are feared by humans, it is a bit of a surprise that scientists don't know much about the predators. For example, until recently, sharks were thought to be solitary creatures searching the seas for food on their own. Now it appears that some sharks are quite social.


SARS-CoV-2 Spike Impairs DNA Damage Repair and Inhibits V(D)J Recombination In Vitro Science & Medicine Blogs · Oct 13, 2021 by MDPI

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has led to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, severely affecting public health and the global economy. Adaptive immunity plays a crucial role in fighting against SARS-CoV-2 infection and directly influences the clinical outcomes of patients.


Here's the most complete map of black holes ever created Science & Medicine Blogs · Jul 29, 2021 by Jak Connor - TweakTown

A German-made space telescope, eROSITA, has collected enough data that astronomers have pieced together the most detailed map of black holes. Published Wed, Jul 28 2021 5:32 AM CDT In less than two years, a German-made space telescope has managed to discover more than 3 million " new" objects.


Deadly Spider Venom Could Repair Hearts and May Save Heart Attack Victims Science & Medicine Blogs · Jul 18, 2021 by Loukia Papadopoulos - Interesting Engineering

Spider venom may be deadly, but it comes with some advantages. In the past, research has found that venom could alleviate pain without causing any adverse side effects. Now, new research out of Australia's University of Queensland is indicating that the venom of the Fraser Island (K'gari) funnel-web spider can help prevent damage caused by a heart attack and even extend the life of donor hearts.



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Infinite Science & Medicine Articles
Battling the Human Trafficking Fight - Part 1

(“Evil People Will Push The Limits of Evil Deeds to Feed their Sick Addiction and Greed”)

Special thanks to GUEST AUTHOR Tim Easton, Owner of Castle Defense 360 IED Response & Active Shooter Instructor, Tactics Trainer, Physical Security & Anti-Terrorism Expert

May 12, 2020 by Special Guest Author - Tim Easton, Anti-Terrorism Expert
Science & Medicine Articles
Battling the Human Trafficking Fight - Part 2 The Social Media Danger

(“Evil People Will Push The Limits of Evil Deeds to Feed their Sick Addiction and Greed”)

Special thanks to GUEST AUTHOR Tim Easton, Owner of Castle Defense 360 IED Response & Active Shooter Instructor, Tactics Trainer, Physical Security & Anti-Terrorism Expert

May 12, 2020 by Special Guest Author - Tim Easton, Anti-Terrorism Expert
Science & Medicine Articles
Broad Institute Research Roundup - June 2019

Seeing cells through a DNA lens, bringing new autism genes to the forefront, mining tuberculosis mutants for new treatment options, and more.

Jun 21, 2019 by Broad Institute
Science & Medicine Articles
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